Perspective, Horizon and the Human Compass: On the Phenomenology of Conversion and Early Modern Mediterranean Travel Images

Date

Friday, November 23, 2018 - 15:00 to 16:30
 

Location

Buchanan Tower, Room 1197 Vancouver , BC
Canada

Description

Perspective, Horizon and the Human Compass: On the Phenomenology of Conversion and Early Modern Mediterranean Travel Images

A talk with the Early Modern Research Cluster 

Conversion is commonly associated with spiritual transformation during
the early modern period, but it was also a means of understanding
change – in nature or in direction. With its emphasis on process and
turning, conversion permeates disparate phenomena, from scientific
treatises, to stage properties, to navigation. Conversion and
navigation comingle, often in surprising ways, in visual imagery
produced by European artists who journeyed to Islamic lands. Beginning
with an account of how perspective and navigation became enmeshed,
this talk turns to how temporal experiences of moving through foreign
terrain became deposited in drawing.
 

About the Presenter

Bronwen Wilson

Department of Art History, UCLA

Bronwen Wilson is Professor of Renaissance and Early Modern art at
UCLA. Her research and teaching explores the artistic and urban
culture of Renaissance Italy and early modern Europe. The histories of
Venetian art, of space and vision, and of European perceptions of the
Ottoman Turks are important for several publications, including The
World in Venice: Print, the City, and Early Modern Identity (winner of
the Roland H. Bainton prize for Art History in 2006).
 
Her recently-completed book, The Face of Uncertainty, turns to increasing
doubt about the trustworthiness of the human face and accompanying
artistic experimentation with physiognomy, animals, and sensation in
Northern Italy. The moving image is the subject of her current study,
“Inscription and the Horizon in Early Modern Mediterranean Travel
Imagery,” which brings to the fore innovative uses of media and ways
in which diverse temporal experiences were materialized in visual
forms.