UBC graduate Kelly Whitmer’s book featured at German Studies conference

The Halle Orphanage as Scientific Community: Observation, Eclecticism, and Pietism in the Early Enlightenmen
The Halle Orphanage as Scientific Community: Observation, Eclecticism, and Pietism in the Early Enlightenmen

A book recently published by Kelly J. Whitmer, who received her PhD from the Department of History in 2008, was the subject of a roundtable discussion at the annual conference of the German Studies Association which took place from September 29 to October 2 in San Diego.   To have an entire session at an academic conference devoted to a discussion of just one book is an exceptional honor for any author.  Kelly’s book, The Halle Orphanage as Scientific Community: Observation, Eclecticism, and Pietism in the Early Enlightenment, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2015.  It is based on the dissertation which Kelly wrote in our department under the supervision of Professors Chris Friedrichs and Robert Brain. Four distinguished experts on early modern science, education or religion commented on Kelly’s book and Kelly then responded.  Kelly is currently an Associate Professor of History at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.

Two other recent graduate students from our department were also on the program of the German Studies conference.  David Meola, who received his PhD in 2012,  presented a paper on “Heroes and Villains:  German Jews, Honor and the fight for Emancipation.”  David is currently the Bert and Fanny Meisler Assistant Professor of History and Jewish Studies at the University of South Alabama.  Eriks Bredovskis, who received his MA in 2016, presented a paper on “German Narratives of the Baltic Sea:  Drawing the German Line in Eastern Europe, 1911-1917.”  Eriks is now a PhD student in history at the University of Toronto.