The Practice of Everyday Colonialism: Indigenous Women at Work in the Hop Fields and Tourist Industry of Puget Sound

TitleThe Practice of Everyday Colonialism: Indigenous Women at Work in the Hop Fields and Tourist Industry of Puget Sound
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsRaibmon, P
JournalLabor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas
Volume3
Pagination23-56
ISBN Number1547-6715
KeywordsAmerican Indians, article, Colonialism, Everyday Life, Labor Migration, Nineteenth Century, Tourism, Working Women
Abstract

Examines the annual labor migration of indigenous American Indian women hop pickers to the fields of western WA state in the late 19th century & their central role in the Puget Sound tourist boom that grew up around the hop harvest. It is demonstrated how the women's labor – both in harvesting the hop crop & in selling baskets, mats, & other crafts they produced from it – was "expropriated to do the work of bourgeois identity formation, wealth creation, & colonial legitimation" for a multitude of stakeholders. The sale of women's labor in the hop fields & the tourist economy is examined, considering how it functioned to produce the "race, class, & gender identities of those who consumed its products." Ways that representations of indigenous workers were employed to advance the colonialist project & enforce dominant narratives of class, race, & gender are described. Figures. K. Hyatt Stewart

Refereed DesignationRefereed